This Is You, This Is Me – Cut & Paste Poetry

this is me cut copy and paste poetry

Date 16-05-2015
Location Atta Galatta, Kormangala, Bengaluru, India
Event description Most poetry writing exercises are designed to help you focus on one particular area of poetry writing, such as rhyme, alliteration, or imagery. This one works on several levels.

First, this exercise provides a nice, Zen-like break from your daily routine because it involves more than writing. You’ll get to search through articles, choose phrases and sentences which catch your imagination and then cut and paste them in a way that makes sense to you. And you have a new poem so very different from the article you chose as the base!

Second, this exercise provides an excellent alternative to recycling articles already published in newspapers, magazines and websites. Let’s hear you bring a new take and perspective on subjects that others have written.

My first entry

I have tried to write a poem from the Excerpt of the book, ‘Istanbul: Memories of a city’. This book has been written by Orhan Pamuk in Turkish and he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in the year 2006.

Excerpt from the book
Here we come to the heart of the matter: I’ve never left Istanbul – never left the houses, streets and neighbourhoods of my childhood. Although I’ve lived in other districts from time to time, fifty years on I find myself back in the Pamuk Apartments, where my first photographs were taken and where my mother first held me in her arms to show me the world. I know this persistence owes something to my imaginary friend, and to the solace I took from the bond between us. But we live in an age defined by mass migration and creative immigrants, and so I am sometimes hard-pressed to explain why I’ve stayed not only in the same place, but the same building. My mother’s sorrowful voice comes back to me, ‘Why don’t you go outside for a while, why don’t you try a change of scene, do some travelling …?’

Conrad, Nabokov, Naipaul – these are writers known for having managed to migrate between languages, cultures, countries, continents, even civilisations. Their imaginations were fed by exile, a nourishment drawn not through roots but through rootlessness; mine, however, requires that I stay in the same city, on the same street, in the same house, gazing at the same view. Istanbul’s fate is my fate: I am attached to this city because it has made me who I am.

Flaubert, who visited Istanbul a hundred and two years before my birth, was struck by the variety of life in its teeming streets; in one of his letters he predicted that in a century’s time it would be the capital of the world. The reverse came true: after the Ottoman Empire collapsed, the world almost forgot that Istanbul existed. The city into which I was born was poorer, shabbier, and more isolated than it had ever been its two-thousand-year history. For me it has always been a city of ruins and of end-of-empire melancholy. I’ve spent my life either battling with this melancholy, or (like all Istanbullus) making it my own.

At least once in a lifetime, self-reflection leads us to examine the circumstances of our birth. Why were we born in this particular corner of the world, on this particular date? These families into which we were born, these countries and cities to which the lottery of life has assigned us – they expect love from us, and in the end, we do love them, from the bottom of our hearts – but did we perhaps deserve better? I sometimes think myself unlucky to have been born in an ageing and impoverished city buried under the ashes of a ruined empire. But a voice inside me always insists this was really a piece of luck. If it were a matter of wealth, then I could certainly count myself fortunate to have been born into an affluent family at a time when the city was at its lowest ebb (though some have ably argued the contrary). Mostly I am disinclined to complain: I’ve accepted the city into which I was born in the same way I’ve accepted my body (much as I would have preferred to be more handsome and better built) and my gender (even though I still ask myself, naively, whether I might have been better off had I been born a woman). This is my fate, and there’s sense arguing with it. This book is about fate ..

(Taken from the official Nobel Prize Committee Website)

My poem on it
A least once in a lifetime,
self-reflection leads us to examine the circumstances of our birth.
Fifty years on I find myself in the Pamuk apartments,
where my first photographs were taken
and where my mother 1st held me in her arms to show me the world.
This is my fate, and there’s sense arguing with it.

I have never left Istanbul
never the homes,
streets and neighborhoods of my childhood.
I sometimes think myself unlucky to have been born in an ageing
and impoverished city buried under the ashes of a ruined empire.
My mother’s sorrowful voice comes back to me,
‘why don’t you go outside for a while,
why don’t you try a change of scene,
do some traveling–?
Although I have lived in other districts from time to time
I am attached to this city because it has made who I am.

The city into which I was born was poorer,
shabbier,
and more isolated then it had ever been its two-thousand-year history.
But a voice inside me always insists this was really a piece of luck.

I know this persistence owes something to my imaginary friend,
and to the solace from the bond between us.
Istanbul’s fate is my fate:
This book is about the fate.

My second entry
I have tried to create a poem from the self-help article, ‘The Power of Thought: Attention! Thought Crossing!’ written by Inna Nirenburg.

Article

What are you thinking – right now? “I’m reading your article!” you say. Well, take a little bit of a closer look. What’s spinning in the back of your mind? Is it that big deadline that’s looming at the end of the week? Or how you’re going to deal with your mother-in-law this weekend? Or maybe you’re worrying about your finances?

Are you even aware of the thoughts going through your head right now? What about… now?

Some Bad News From the Thought Police

Scientists estimate that an average person will think at a rate of roughly between 1 and 4 thoughts per second while awake. That’s well over 60,000 thoughts during a typical day! And, of all this jabbering going on in your head, it’s estimated that you’ve thought over 95% of your thoughts before. So, not only is your mind generally on a constant hamster wheel, but it’s also doing this spinning continuously, unproductively – and unoriginally.

The Power Between Your Ears – It’s Not What You Think

Enough bad news? Ok – now here’s the other side of the story. You have within you the greatest, simplest, and most powerful tool imaginable. It can lead you to great prosperity, joy, and fulfillment – or it can drop you instantly into the depths of despair and negativity.

No, I’m not talking simply about the power of thought – not even a fraction of those thousands of stale, repeat thoughts running through your head right now will be of much use to you. (Trust me; nope, not even the one wondering for the tenth time whether you turned the stove off this morning). But what is powerful is where you put your attention within all this clatter.

Mr. Webster Says:

“Attention: Concentration of the mental powers; a close or careful observing or listening”. So how does that apply to you? “Concentration of the mental powers” – all too often, we give away the concentration part of our attention to things utterly undeserving. Thoughts of worry, negative predictions, minor irritations, and daily minutiae are hardly productive, and take up too much room in your head.

And this leaves very little space for the second, critical, aspect of attention: “a close or careful observing or listening”. We, as a culture, don’t like to sit back and listen. We prefer to be constantly inundated with forceful messages which grab our attention and don’t let go. We too often forget to sit back and actually listen to the small voice of intuition. You know, the one that already has the answers that we’re trying so hard to figure out.

Try It Now

Give it a shot. Really. Stop for a minute, and focus actively on your thoughts – concentrate. What are you thinking? You know, that quiet and incessant little buzz behind your eyes; that unsettled feeling – what’s behind that? Now shift your attention to listening, see if there’s a message waiting for you. Just below the surface, what is it saying? Listen… You’re now learning to distinguish the noise of your mind from the voice of your intuition, your inner knowing – all through the tool of attention.

You Are Not Your Thoughts

There’s huge power in putting your attention actively on your thoughts. This helps you to separate the you from the thought. You are not your thoughts, you are having thoughts, they are passing through your head. You are bigger than your thoughts, and you can choose whether or not you want to give them power. And you do this by either giving them your attention, or by allowing them to just float on by.

Head and Heart

And it’s not just thoughts that you can focus your attention on. As cognitive psychologists and holistic healers have known for years, emotions and thoughts are deeply intertwined. One influences the other, and both influence your physical biochemistry. So learning to actively focus your attention on the thoughts and feelings you want, while letting go of those you don’t want, could be the best thing you’ll ever do for your health, your well being, and your happiness.

Oy Vey

“Great”, you may say. “But it isn’t so easy to catch my thoughts and feelings, or to do something about them. I don’t even know how I feel half of the time, and the thoughts go by so quickly!” Fear not – here’s are a few simple exercises.

Use Your Words

One way to “catch” your fleeting thoughts and feelings and to focus your attention on them is to “use your words”. Just like a parent may tell an unruly and whining child who is about to pick a fight to “use your words” to explain what’s bothering him, so can you gently nudge yourself to discipline. This may seem silly, but it’s remarkably powerful. Write down or speak out loud (or into a tape recorder) exactly what the thoughts and feelings are. Articulating them clearly gives them shape and focus, and allows you much more freedom to act in a way that supports your growth.

Thanks For Sharing

Now, as for how to manage the spinning and repeating thoughts, here’s a very simple and effective trick. Just like a parent knows not to take everything their child says too seriously, you can also learn to distinguish helpful thoughts and feelings from destructive ones. You can simply tell your thinker – “thanks for sharing. I will take your comments under advisement. Now, please move along”.

So What?

So how does all this relate to helping you find “what’s next”, or guiding you to “a you-er you”? Very directly, actually. If you practice putting your direct attention on the jabbering of your mind, articulating those slippery thoughts, and consciously and purposefully telling them “thanks for sharing!” and then purposefully re-focusing your attention where YOU choose, you will begin to create the space for your true inner voice to come through.

Plant the Seeds:

Now it’s your turn. Take a couple of minutes and try these exercises. Really. Try it now. You never know – hey, what’s next…?

1. Practice noticing your thoughts. Try the exercise in the “Try it Now” section above. Really.

2. Use your words. Get over feeling silly, and actually write down what your thoughts are. Try speaking, try using a tape recorder. Experiment. Notice which thoughts show up over and over. Note your top 5 – make friends with them, and thank them profusely for sharing. And remember – attention is power. What thoughts are you giving your power to?

3. Choose consciously. Once you become aware of the thoughts going through your head, you can begin to make choices. For example: “Hm, I’ve been thinking a lot about how unhappy I am in my job. Thanks for sharing. Duly noted. I think I’ll choose to focus my attention elsewhere right now, thanks.”

P.S. So – what are you thinking… now?

4. Try it out: set aside 5 (just five!) minutes every day to just BE. No distractions, no thoughts, no worries, no to-do lists. After a week or two, see what you got from this experience.

(Read the entire article on the website topachievement.com)

My poem from this article
What are you thinking – right now?
You know
all of this jabbering going in your head,
the one that already has the answers
that we are trying so hard to figure out.
So how does that apply to you?
Stop for a minute,
and focus actively on your thoughts
and concentrate!!

What are you thinking-right now?
Ok. now here’s the other side of the story
The power between your ears
It’s not what you think
Thoughts of worry,
and daily miniutiate are hardly productive,
they are passing through your head.
we give away the concentration part of our attention
to things utterly undeserving.

What are you thinking right now?
You are not your thoughts,
you are having thoughts
emotions and thoughts are deeply intertwined
and both influence your physical biochemistry.
We, as a culture, don’t like to sit back and listen
As how to manage the spining and repeating thought,
here is a very simple and effective trick?

What are you thinking- right now?
Practice noticing your thoughts
shift your attention to listening,
just below the surface,
what is it saying?
Get over feeling silly,
notice which thoughts show up over and over
and actually write down what your thoughts are.
what thoughts are you giving your power to?

So, what are you thinking- right now?
Enough bad news?
Set aside 5 (just five) minutes every day to just brain exercise
you can begin to make choices
once you became aware of the thoughts going through your head
learning to actively focus your attention on the thoughts and feelings you want,
while letting go of those you don’t want
You will begin to create the space for your inner voice to come through
It can lead you to great prosperity, joy, and fulfillment.

What are you thinking.. right now?
Now it’s your turn…to think

More information:
Let Poetry Be, Facebook page
Event Page

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2 responses to “This Is You, This Is Me – Cut & Paste Poetry

  1. A very well structured blog post…I really liked the way you described the process involved in the activity and the outcome obtained…Nice 🙂

    Like

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